On being a workaholic idiot.

I’m sitting here, glancing at the post I made a week ago that suggested I would be posting several things this week. That it is Saturday already has taken me a little by surprise, if I’m honest. What happened to those posts? Time.

I wasn’t planning to write about boring things like “my schedule”, because I find it self-obsessed. But then I thought, hey, I like reading how other creative structure their time, and I don’t accuse them of self-obsession. It provides a feeling of shared experience, even moral support, because you realise you’re not the only one slogging away in isolation for fourteen hours a day.

So, here I am, giving you a brief lowdown of “The Typical Dary Day”.

I wake at noon. From 1pm until 4pm, I’m either working to pay my bills (employment opportunities are almost non-existent out here, so I presently do housework for my grandparents) or reading/studying. Or, in today’s case, writing this. Around 4pm I move on to illustration work, and around 8-9pm I start writing.

Yes, I’m another of those crazy people who finds it easier to write at night. It’s quieter, for most part, and the bulk of the day’s responsibilities have been dealt with. I did try to readjust my schedule over 2012, but for a start my body clock refused to conform to early-morning awakenings, and attempts to write during the morning/afternoon were often interrupted by aforementioned daily responsibilities. 2013 sees a return to old habits.

I write for around six to seven hours, usually stopping some time between 2am and 4am; it depends on what I’m writing, and how into it I am. Any time I have remaining at the end of the day, I use to relax. Or watch documentaries. When Sunday rolls around, I take stock of my accomplishments over the week and decide whether or not I’m allowed to take the day off. Inevitably, however, I’ll end up doing some work, because I can never relax for more than a couple of hours without getting irritated and feeling lazy. No, really. Workaholic much?

If you’re wondering, the ‘weekly target’ is 15,000 words, across drafts, or 7500 if I’m editing.

So there you go. It’s not quite Hunter S Thompson’s schedule…

what-a-character

…but then I don’t have the money to spend on wine…

So, since I’ve been awfully self-indulgent in this post, I feel it only right to ask what your schedule is like, assuming you have one. I’m especially interested to hear how other creatives work their time. I know I’m not the only overworked idiot out there.

Posted on January 19, 2013, in Blog. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. My daily schedule is pretty standard, although easier to write as a flow-chart beginning with the night before.

    1) Do I have to do something in the day tomorrow? Yes = go to bed early, get up early. No = Stay up gaming of course, and wake up at 2PMish.
    2) If I have something to do during the day, well, go out and do it. When I get home, or wake up late, get on PC, check Facebook and whatnot then get to gaming.

    My weekly schedule, on the other hand, is pretty crazy… I can’t be bothered going into it, but it involves working, Bible studies, Nerf wars, parkour training sessions, and probably something else I forgot (like the 9 hour drive I just got back from). Oh, and sporadically stopping in at the library when I’m nearby. Books. :3

    As for creating… Well, I do a little writing, a little drawing, a little programming. All of these I basically do whenever. Or in the case of programming, if a friend of mine goes “hey, I started work on a new game engine, do stuff with it”, I put it off for a few days to give him time to fix the worst bugs then give in to his nagging and work on it at that time.

    • Sounds a lot like my schedule before I’d settled down on a project! Only I didn’t have friends who created game engines, so I would use those dodgy old ‘Make Your Own Game’ programs instead. Glory days!

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